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Thumbnail: Unstoppable: Tony Martin heads for a stage win ( Cor Vos) (cyclingtips.com.au). "After an opening three days filled with frustration, Tony Martin expunged his woes on stage 4 of the Tour de France with a daring late attack that saw him move into the yellow jersey.

The German finished second in the opening day time trial before missing out on the yellow jersey the next day due to a botched Etixx sprint, and ending stage 3 second on GC by a solitary second behind Chris Froome." (cyclingnews.com)

July 7, 2015









Thumbnail: After coming close on the first three stages, Tony Martin took the yellow jersey on Tuesday. (Getty Images Sport). "Having missed out on the yellow jersey on stage 1 by five seconds, stage 2 by three seconds and stage 3 by less than one second, Tony Martin powered away from a a select group in the final three kilometres of stage 4 to claim stage honours and move into the overall lead at the Tour de France. Martin becomes the fourth maillot jaune of the race, holding a 12 second advantage over Chris Froome (Team Sky)." (cyclingnews.com)

July 7, 2015








Thumbnail: Despite finishing on a teammate's ill-fitting bike, Tony Martin rode away from the field to claim yellow. Photo: Tim De Waele. "During Tuesday’s stage 4 of the Tour de France, Tony Martin and Thibault Pinot both suffered late-race mechanicals at almost the exact same time and place — with about 20km remaining in the cobbled stage. But the two riders reacted in very different ways, and that made all the difference." (velonews.com)

July 7, 2015







Thumbnail: Leblanc and Prudhomme. "Want to draw your own route for the Tour de France? You could start with a map and a pen but what you really need is a TV remote control, if not in your hand then in your mind.

More than ever the Tour de France route is being designed for television viewers, to make racing rhyme with ratings and ensuring that the opening week is as worth watching as the mountain stages. Today’s feared cobbled stage is just one example." (inrng.com)

July 7, 2015






Thumbnail: an ideal sprint he aims for a 12 seconds effort.. "They say there is no such thing as second place in the Tour de France. The competition is hot, and the individual cyclists and their teams need to cover every possible detail in order to get the edge required to win.

It can even come down to a matter of timing the start of their crucial final sprint within a one or two second window. And if they’re slightly off the mark, it could cost them the stage victory, as happened on Tuesday." (capovelo.com)

July 7, 2015






Thumbnail: 23 Deutsche in dieser Saison bei WorldTour-Teams unter Vertrag | Radsport bei rad-net.de. "After a hugely disappointing crash yesterday, Rick Zabel took the first pro win of his short career when he came out on top in the reduced bunch sprint at the end of the third stage of the Tour of Austria.

The German held off Angel Vicioso and Jan Tratnik but the Spaniard got a nice consolation prize as he took over the leader’s jersey with a 1-second advantage over Gerald Ciolek." (cyclingnews.com) (cyclingquotes.com)

July 7, 2015






Thumbnail: Oleksandr Polivoda (Kolss Cycling Team) wins stage 1 (7Cycling). "Kolss BDC rider takes over the race lead" (cyclingnews.com)




July 7, 2015





2014-15 Races & Results.

Tour de France 2015 - July 4-26 (Stages & Results),

Giro Rosa - July 3-12 (Stages & Results),

Tour of Austria - July 4-12 (Stages & Results),

Tour of Qinghai Lake - July 5-17 (Stages & Results),

Vuelta a España 2015 - Aug 22-Sept 13 (Stages),

UCI Road World Championship 2015 - Sept 20-27 (Stages),

Santos Tour Down Under 2016 - Jan 17-24 (Stages),

Tour de Suisse - June 13-21 (Results),

Aviva Women's Tour - June 17-21 (Results),

Critérium du Dauphiné - June 7-14 (Results),

Giro d'Italia 2015 - May 9-31 (Results),

More... (cyclingnews.com)

July 7, 2015









Thumbnail: Stage 5 preview . "Wednesday's Tour de France Stage 5 departs at --pm CET (--am U.S. Eastern). The expected finish is at around --pm CET (--am U.S. Eastern).

Tour de France live streaming video should get underway at around 14:15 CET (5:15 AM PST)." (steephill.tv) (cyclingfans.com)

July 7, 2015







Thumbnail: There’s never a good time to crash out. "Crosswinds, the Ardennes and now it’s time for some cobbles in the North of France. The Tour de France continues its tour of the spring classics.

Fabian Cancellara is out with a broken back, others left the race too and all before today’s stage, the most feared of them all."  (inrng.com)

July 6, 2015







Thumbnail: Doug Pensinger/Getty Images
It's a journey to the cobblestones of Paris-Roubaix, and all the chaos that implies. "The race features the Nord-Pas de Calais region of France, an area of somewhat mixed Flemish and French influence. The Schelde becomes the Escaut and the kasseien become pavé, but like most border areas of Europe it's not as black and white as all that.

The region is known for mining of coal, and legends of Jean Stablinski riding over the mines he and his family previously had worked in the Arenberg Forest are taught to every French schoolchild in the area. [Cycling is part of the local curriculum, right?]

OK maybe not, but where there's coal, there's a history of immigration, and the culture becomes quite a tapestry, which this already was anyway. Speaking of tapestries, back when this was part of the County of Flanders, it was also part of the whole Low Countries textile boom. But that's been a while." (podiumcafe.com)

July 6, 2015








Thumbnail: Joaquim Rodriguez (Katusha) attacked stage 3's final climb, the Mur de Huy, to win ahead of Chris Froome (Sky), who claimed the Tour's yellow jersey with his second-place finish. Photo: AFP PHOTO / ERIC FEFERBERG. "Joaquim Rodriguez delivered a devastating attack in the final few hundred meters of racing on the Mur de Huy to win Tour de France stage 3, Monday in Huy, Belgium.

After Chris Froome went to the front early on the Mur, with 500 meters to go, the front group disintegrated. Rodriguez was ready for the final, steep kicker and attacked to win just ahead of Froome. Alexis Vuillermoz finished third.

“The Mur de Huy is something that I know extremely well — I’ve seen it before,” Rodriguez said.

“It was a little bit complicated. I could see that I was starting to feel pretty good, and then the last little move that I made, I was able to make the difference in the end.”

Off the back, in pain from a major crash, Cancellara relinquished the yellow jersey he won only 24 hours earlier." (cyclingnews.com) (velonews.com)

July 6, 2015










Thumbnail: William Bonnet his the road face first at araound 50kmh before he was forced to abandon the Tour de France Photo: REUTERS. "Christian Prudhomme may have upset some by stopping the race, but he made the right decision; Chris Froome has the legs to win a second Tour; Simon Yates is nails and two more things we learned from stage three " (telegraph.co.uk)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: Fabian Cancellara after a crash on stage three of the 2015 Tour de France . "Fabian Cancellara was rushed to hospital after the finale of the Tour de France stage three to the Mur de Huy, after coming down in a huge crash 55km from the finish.

The race leader appeared to be holding his lower back in pain after the incident, the same part of his back where he broke a vertebrae at E3 Harelbeke earlier this year." (cyclingweekly.co.uk)

July 6, 2015







Thumbnail: Dave Tanner (IAM Cycling) was part of the breakaway with Ben Hermans (BMC) (Bettini Photo). "David Tanner continued IAM’s impressive run of success in the Tour of Austria when he made it two in a row for the Swiss team.

With a late attack, he managed to hold off the peloton and take a surprise victory while Clement Venturini and Peter Kusztor completed the podium. Gerald Ciolek picked up an important bonus second and so defended his overall lead by the tiniest of margins." (cyclingnews.com) (cyclingquotes.com)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: www.cyclingquotes.com
CyclingQuotes.com Kump and Roglic make it a great day for Adria Mobil in Slovenia. "Second stage win for Adria Mobil's overall race leader." (cyclingnews.com)




July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: Luis Lemus will be Airgas-Safeway's go-to rider in the high mountains of the Tour of Qinghai Lake. Photo: Daebong Kim . "Airgas-Safeway may have been snubbed by the Amgen Tour of California, but the U.S.-registered UCI Continental cycling team is wasting little time moving on.

In just its second year of existence, Airgas-Safeway currently finds itself at the start of a grueling two-race stretch beginning with the pinnacle of the UCI Asia Tour as one of 22 teams competing in the 14th Tour of Qinghai Lake (2.HC) in China.

Known as the “highest” pro cycling race in the world with an elevation averaging more than 9,840 feet, the 13-day, 2,027-kilometer stage race has attracted teams from around the globe, including Italian WorldTour team Lampre-Merida, as well as Italian Pro Continental teams Nippo-Vini Fantini and Southeast Pro Cycling." (velonews.com)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: The favourites line out for the finale of La Fleche Wallonne (Tim de Waele/TDWSport.com). "After an opening two days in which the peloton didn’t traverse as much as a speed bump, the hills start in the Tour de France today with  finish atop the Mur de Huy.

Stage three is an entirely Belgian affair and takes the riders 159.5 kilometres from Anvers in the north towards Huy for a finish that replicates the Flèche-Wallonne Classic – so often decided on the fearsome gradients of the 1.3km Mur." (cyclingnews.com)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: The prototype Stages meter on Chris Froome's Tour de France bike (Ben Delaney/Immediate Media). "Team Sky's Tour de France hope Chris Froome has a prototype Stages power meter on his race bike, but neither team mechanics nor Stages Cycling is talking about it.

Stages inline power meters are lightweight units that mount on the left crank of metal cranks, measuring deflection with strain gauges.

The prototype Stages meter on Froome's Tour bike is also mounted on the left crank and is roughly the same length as current units but is much thinner." (cyclingnews.com)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: The new Foil is a complete redesign from the head tube going back. "Win Every Ride – that’s the mentality that helps a company design a bike to be 27 seconds faster over a 40k distance than their previous frame, which is exactly what Scott has done with their completely redesigned Foil.

Compared to its predecessor, the new Foil saves an average of 6 Watts over the tested yaw spectrum. This equates to a gain of 27 seconds over 40 kilometers with an average speed of 45kph.

Yet speed was not the only consideration." (aerogeeks.com)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: And so I got to ride an e-bike around Tokyo for a few hours. "“This is the future. It will change everything!” said Koichiro Nakamura as he pointed to a bright green women’s bike in front of his office. We had met to discuss cycling and the media in Japan… and this bike wasn’t what I expected.

After I got over my initial surprise, I remembered riding through Tokyo last year on the way to TOEI, the great constructeurs of classic cyclotouring bikes. As we approached a narrow underpass, a woman on a similar city bike passed us and cut in front of Hahn in a maneuver that would not have been out of place in a cyclocross race.

She took the “holeshot” and accelerated away. Nothing about her bike or her appearance suggested a competitive nature… but she had an electric motor that greatly enhanced her power output." (janheine.wordpress.com)

July 6, 2015








Thumbnail: André Greipel (Lotto Soudal) ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images. "As the sunny skies and warm weather of Utrecht gave way to treacherous conditions on the exit from Rotterdam, stage 2 of the Tour de France burst to life. As news came over race radio that Nairo Quintana was in trouble, Etixx Quick Step put the hammer down and split the race to pieces in the crosswinds.

In a bunch sprint, the stage spoils went to Andre Greipel after Mark Cavendish led out the sprint with 200 meters to go, pipping Peter Sagan at the post, with Fabian Cancellara taking third and the maillot jaune after Rohan Dennis was caught out in the wind." (cyclingnews.com)

July 5, 2015









Thumbnail: Balint Hamvas. "Megan Guarnier won stage two of the Giro Rosa from an elite group of eight riders that took shape over the climbs and descents that punctuated the second half of the stage." (cyclingtips.com.au)

July 5, 2015






Thumbnail: Annalisa Cucinotta (Ale Cipollini) wins stage 4 (Sean Robinson/Velofocus). "Annalisa Cucinotta won the bunch sprint to the finish line in Pozzo d'Adda to win stage 4 at the Giro Rosa on Tuesday. The Italian sprinter beat her compatriots Marta Bastianelli and Elena Cecchini.

American rider Megan Guarnier finished the day safely in the main field and maintained her lead in the overall classification, two seconds ahead of Anna van der Breggen and five seconds ahead of Ashlegh Moolman-Pasio. " (cyclingnews.com)

July 7, 2015









Thumbnail: Tejay van Garderen (BMC) (Tim de Waele/TDWSport.com). "There was an element of relief for Tejay van Garderen at the end of stage 4 of the Tour de France after making it through with his general classification hopes still intact.

The BMC rider arrived at the finish line in Cambrai with the other favorites, three seconds down on stage winner Tony Martin, and sits just 25 seconds behind the German in the general classification." (cyclingnews.com)

July 7, 2015








Thumbnail: ... "Using a combination of math, experience, and tactical acumen, some Tour de France teams made the decision to swap bikes halfway through Tuesday’s cobble-strewn stage 4. Using the same math, experience, and tactical acumen, others did not.

The difference in tactics was dependent, according to one mechanic involved in the decision-making, on each team’s aversion to risk." (velonews.com)

July 7, 2015






Thumbnail: A climb up the Mur de Huy was a tough end to the third stage of the Tour. Photo: Tim De Waele . "The transition stage, those long, predictable parades filled with fruitless breakaways, tempo riding, and fast sprint finishes, is dead. It was 102.

The first week of the Tour de France has always been hectic and nervous, filled with crashes and abandonments. But there has been a distinct trend toward shorter, more complicated stages in recent years.

“You’ve seen it in the Giro [d’Italia] this year as well,” said Sky team principal David Brailsford, speaking of the death of predictable stages in recent grand tours. “I don’t think [transition stages] exist anymore, the race is on all the time, you’ve gotta concentrate the whole time, the teams that can be there and manage the situation for any eventuality at any stage is the team that’s going to come out on top.”" (velonews.com)

July 7, 2015







Thumbnail: William Bonnet (FDJ) cut his head but also fractured his C2 vetebrae (Getty Images Sport). "The double crashes on a fast descent in the Ardennes at the Tour de France on stage 3 left many of the riders battered, scraped and bruised on the worst possible day - right before they hit the cobbles of Northern France.

So numerous were the injured that race organizers were forced to halt the stage to let the medics do their jobs." (cyclingnews.com)

July 7, 2015






Thumbnail: Breaking a bone and finishing a stage is one thing. "The crash footage from last night’s stage of the Tour de France is horrific to watch, and yet we share it with our friends. The images are awful to look at, but we keep clicking to the next one.

And as we learn more about the aftermath of hitting the ground that hard, we feel a mix of admiration and empathy; for the riders and for their teams.

As we consume these images, we learn about the riders we follow but we also learn about ourselves. I watch how these riders respond to each challenge and I find myself wondering: how I would respond in a similar situation?" (sbs.com.au)

July 7, 2015






Thumbnail: The Best Stages to See: Ok, this is self-explanatory. "Tomorrow I’ll be headed up to watch another few stages of the Tour de France (TdF).  Having lived in France now for three years and going on our 4th Tour de France, we’ve seen quite a few stages. 

Usually 3-6 each year, so I’m probably in the ~15 stages realm.  Obviously there are those that have seen many more stages than I, and certainly those that have seen less. 

But since I often get asked about tips for spectating Le Tour, I figured I’d just write them all down." (dcrainmaker.com)

July 7, 2015






Thumbnail: While endurance bikes came out in abundance for stage 4's cobbles, there were also plenty of standard road race bikes and even aero bikes (Ben Delaney / Immediate Media). "There is no such thing as the one perfect bike for a race day that encompasses tarmac and cobblestones.

As the Tour de France again returned to the pavé this year, riders and mechanics from the 22 teams chose a wide spread of bikes, tubulars and even tubeless setups for stage 4, which many were calling “Paris-Roubaix day” for its resemblance to the spring classic." (bikeradar.com)

July 7, 2015









Thumbnail: © Cor Vos. "Two times second in the first three stages, Lucinda Brand climbed to the top step of the podium in Mantova on Monday.

The Dutchwoman was quickest from a nine-rider breakaway that formed just beyond the day’s only categorized climb. Italians Valentina Scandolara and Elena Cecchini were forced to settle for the minor podium positions." (cyclingtips.com.au)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: A race official stop the peloton (Getty Images Sport). "Tour de France director Christian Prudhomme has defended the unusual step of neutralizing the race following a mass crash with 58 kilometers remaining on stage three from Antwerp to the Mur de Huy, explaining that it was decided to do so as all of the following ambulances and medical cars were occupied in provided assistance to fallen riders."

"...many other riders went down, so it was 40 or so riders who were involved in total. The four ambulances and two medical cars were held up taking care of them, which meant that there was no ambulance left to look after the 120 riders in the peloton between there and the end of the race." (cyclingnews.com)

July 6, 2015







Thumbnail: After crashing heavilly with 60km to go, losing the yellow jersey was the least of Fabian Cancellara's concerns as he struggled to finish Stage 3 of the Tour de France. "The four-time world time trial champion was whisked off to the hospital for a CT scan shortly after he crossed the finish line of the crash-marred stage.

Hours later his Trek Factory Racing team confirmed that he had sustained two transverse process fractures, in two vertebrae bones of his lower back.

It is the identical injury he sustained in E3 Harelbeke last March, but this time the L3 and L4 vertebrae on the right side were the culprits, not the L2 and L3 on the left side, which he injured in Harelbeke."  (sbs.com.au)

July 6, 2015








Thumbnail: Chris Froome on stage three of the 2015 Tour de France . "It might be an unpredictable and chaotic opening week of this year’s Tour de France but Team Sky principal Dave Brailsford has revealed that his squad have approached the tricky series of ‘classic’ stages the way it knows best: with a plan.

After Chris Froome finished second on the Mur de Huy to take over the race lead from Fabian Cancellara, Brailsford explained that the day unfolded exactly as he and the team had meticulously planned." (cyclingweekly.co.uk)

July 6, 2015











Thumbnail: Christian Prudhomme halts stage 3 of the Tour de France (Getty Images Sport). "Tom Domoulin, William Bonnet, Simon Gerrans  and othershave abandoned the Tour de France during stage three after a high-speed crash with approximately 65km to go.

Race leader Fabian Cancellara also crashed hard but managed to continue racing. Numerous other riders also crashed and were battered and bruised, including Michael Mathews, Greg Henderson and Johan Van Summeren. " (cyclingnews.com)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: Peter Sagan at the Tour de France 2015 . "It’s the classic conundrum; can a sprinter succeed in a team geared towards a GC favorite? It’s not easy, even with nine-man teams, particularly on a Grand Tour like this year’s Tour de France with a first week full of so many pitfalls for the overall contenders.

Moreover, after last year’s disaster for Chris Froome on the cobbles stage and Vincenzo Nibali putting so much time into his rivals on the same stage, teams will be even more wary of protecting their leaders." (cyclingweekly.co.uk)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: Words & images: James Startt. "With his thick waves of hair and bold glasses, Danish filmmaker Jørgen Leth still cuts an imposing image. And at the age of 78, he remains one of the quiet giants of the Tour de France.

Cycling fans, of course know Leth for his historic cycling films such as Stars and Watercarriers, or his epic film of the Paris-Roubaix classic, A Sunday in Hell. After all, what self-respecting aficionado has not discussed that awe-inspiring move, when Italy’s Francesco Moser suddenly enters the camera frame and elbows past French riders, Raymond Poulidor and Jean-Pierre Danguillaume, with a grace that defies the rugged cobbles that they are on?" (pelotonmagazine.com)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: Mark Cavendish missed the win, and the podium, in stage 2. Photo: Tim De Waele . "Mark Cavendish’s Tour de France began in a bad way in 2014 when he crashed in the sprint of stage 1 in his mother’s hometown of Harrogate and abandoned. This 2015 Tour began better, but not by much.

The normally quick Cav, winner of 13 races so far this year, could not close stage 2 on top, and by fading back to fourth, threw away teammate Tony Martin’s chance to put on the yellow jersey.

Etixx Quick-Step’s general manager, Patrick Lefevere, was not happy. He told VeloNews, “Everything that could go wrong, did.”

Etixx helped destroy the peloton Sunday as the Tour de France raced along the west coast of the Netherlands. In the cross-winds and rain, they pulled clear a 26-man escape." (velonews.com)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: Marco Pantani stands on the podium after winning the 1998 Tour de France Photograph: Laurent Rebours/AP . "It is July 1998 and the flawed genius of Italian cycling is crossing the finish line on the Champs-Élysées in the Yellow Jersey after one of the most controversial Tours in history.

The 20 days in which the race has wound around the Hexagon have seen the withdrawal of the mighty Festina squad after their soigneur Willy Voet was caught with a carload of EPO, the bitter tears of a peroxided Richard Virenque, a series of hotel raids that led to all four Spanish teams dropping out of the race, a procession of arrests, confessions and sit-down protests, and a jut-chinned rebel sitting cross legged in the road as the race teetered on the edge of disaster.

That image of “il Pirata”, his goateed face the picture of insouciance, has become iconic." (theguardian.com)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: You know it's going to be a hot day of racing when you're having to cool yourself off before the start. "Well, we have seen our first signs of the possible overall contenders for this year’s Giro Rosa as we returned to the motherland of Italy and hit the hills of Treviso. Stage two created a shake-up of the overall classification with eight riders making it to the finish line more than a minute ahead of the rest.

It was a mixed stage today. The first 75km were predominantly flat and the final 45km included three classified climbs over 30km before a 15km mostly downhill or flat run-in the finish." (cyclingtips.com.au)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: Giro Rosa race reports. "It’s back! Ella Picks Monday is our effort to share with you the best, most important or most interesting content we stumbled upon over the past week.

We’re the first to admit that our attention over the last few days has been squarely on the all-exciting Giro Rosa; yet, we’ve still managed to come across lots of other good finds.

Our picks for the week include Mara Abbott’s ode to fans, training tips from Lenzerheide XCO World Cup silver medallist Lea Davison and a piece that aims to answer the question “Why don’t more women race?”. Enjoy!" (cyclingtips.com.au)

July 6, 2015











Thumbnail: Greipel's victory put him in the green jersey. "Twelve months to the day since his crash in Harrogate, things looked set up perfectly for the Manx Missile. He was in the front group with a load of Etixx QuickStep team mates and the wind had died down a bit after the earlier squall.

Cavendish's 26th Tour stage win was on the cards. But he was left to sprint from a long way out, it looked like well over 300m, and was overhauled a few meters from the line.

What was almost worse, as he realized he was beaten and looked over at stage winner Andre Greipel and second placed Peter Sagan, Cavendish was also caught and passed by Fabian Cancellara." (telegraph.co.uk)

July 5, 2015








Thumbnail: Certified badass Nairo Quintana looks utterly unperturbed on the start line (Matthew Allen / Immediate Media). "Eusebio Unzue’s involvement with the Movistar set-up stretches back more than 30 years, through the eras of Reynolds and Banesto, the reigns of Pedro Delgado and Miguel Indurain, but if he ever tires of team management, then a second career as a spin doctor surely awaits.

On the man-made island of Neeltje-Jans after stage 2 of the Tour de France, as a huddle of television crews and reporters swarmed around the Movistar team bus, Unzue was quick to put an optimistic slant on what has been an inauspicious start to Nairo Quintana’s bid for overall victory." (cyclingnews.com)

July 5, 2015






Thumbnail: Pic: PezCyclingNews... "The Tour podium looks very nice, but the best photos are coming from Italy and the Giro Rosa. This is from stage 3 to Mantova."

(pezcyclingnews.com)














July 7, 2015

















July 7, 2015






Thumbnail: Doping remains a serious issue in cycling. The recent CIRC report estimated at least 20 percent of the peloton is still cheating. Photo: Tim De Waele. "Doping investigators may stage nighttime raids to test Tour de France riders, UCI president Brian Cookson said in an interview released Tuesday.

“It is a possibility. No team should think that they can escape at this level,” Cookson, whose federation gets some of the closest anti-doping attention in the world, told Le Monde newspaper.

A new World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) code of conduct allows tests on athletes “at any time.” The code is not yet effective in France however, because of a debate over the legal terms used, which could make a night raid controversial. A government decree is not expected until after the race finishes. The French anti-doping agency, the AFLD, is responsible for Tour de France tests on behalf of the UCI’s independent anti-doping foundation." (velonews.com)

July 7, 2015










Thumbnail: Team manager Viatcheslav Ekimov and Roman Arnold President Canyon Bikes (Tim de Waele/TDWSport.com). "The future of the Katusha WorldTour team has moved a step closer to safety with team boss Viatcheslav Ekimov confirming to Cyclingnews that he had a verbal agreement with his title sponsor for the next two years.

The existing Katusha deal expires at the end of 2015 but Ekimov has already re-signed a number of key riders, including Alexander Kristoff." (velonews.com)

July 7, 2015






Thumbnail: Fabian Cancellara puts on the yellow jersey following stage 2. (Getty Images Sport). "Fabian Cancellara's press conference after taking the yellow jersey in Zeeland on Sunday evening ran on so long that one wondered if he sensed it might be the final time in his career that he found himself in such a position at the Tour de France.

In the build-up to the race, Cancellara had neither confirmed nor denied speculation that this would prove to be his last appearance at the Tour, given that his retirement is – very provisionally, mind – pencilled in for when his current contract expires at the end of 2016." (cyclingnews.com)

July 7, 2015







Thumbnail: Vincenzo Nibali mastered the cobbles last year, and Roger Hammond believes the pave should be a regular part of the Tour de France to ensure the riders are tested on all terrains (Pic: Bruno Bade/ASO). "Approaching a cobbled stage at the Tour de France should be treated in the same way you would approach a mountain stage, according to Britain’s former Classics hardman Roger Hammond, and only the under-prepared should fear the pavé.

Stage four of the 2015 Tour includes 13.3km of pavé and Hammond, who finished on the podium at Paris-Roubaix during a career which saw him make a name for himself tackling the cobblestones of Belgium and Northern France, is pleased to see the cobbles return to the Tour route for a second consecutive year." (roadcyclinguk.com)

July 7, 2015






Thumbnail: Svein Tuft slips on a jacket with tubes running through the garment. The tubes are hooked up to what looked like a water pump, presumably to push cold water through the jacket. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews.com. "In all that luggage coming in and out of the airport in Amsterdam, all towed behind cycling fans headed to Utrecht for stages 1 and 2 of the 2015 Tour de France, it’s likely that there was a pair of long pants and a jacket in each one.

The Netherlands isn’t a country known for its oppressive heat, yet in the days leading up to stage 1, temperatures skyrocketed, setting weather records in consecutive days. Those long pants and jackets stayed stowed in carry-on luggage and riders kept their arm-warmers on the bus." (velonews.com)

July 7, 2015






Thumbnail: Johnny Hoogerland ended up in a barbed-wire fence during the 2011 Tour de France Photo: AFP. "Even by cycling standards, the footage is hard to watch.

During stage three of the Tour de France yesterday, an enormous crash in the main peloton threw a host of riders off their bikes. In the ensuing melee, William Bonnet, who appeared to trigger the crash when he clipped a wheel, broke a cervical vertebra, while yellow jersey holder Fabian Cancellara went somersaulting dramatically into a roadside hedge, his bicycle pirouetting in the air behind him." (telegraph.co.uk)

July 7, 2015






Thumbnail: Words & images: James Startt. "The Tour de France attracts bike fans from around the world, many of whom come with bikes. At the start of this year’s Tour, many Dutch fans flocked to the roadside on their city cruisers.

And when the Tour hits the mountains, thousands of fans will ride the climbs on their own racing bikes. But for the past five years, only one fan has dared to follow the Tour on a historic Draisine bicycle." (pelotonmagazine.com)

July 7, 2015


























July 6, 2015






Photo: Cor Vos "There has been a period of silence from the BMC Racing Team about Taylor Phinney and his ongoing return from serious injury, but the team’s President Jim Ochowicz confirmed on Monday morning that he is continuing to make progress.

Ochowicz spoke to CyclingTips on the matter and said that a 2015 return was still possible.

“All I can say about Taylor is that he continues to improve and that we are hoping that he races before the end of the season,” he said. “But there is no specific date yet." (cyclingtips.com.au)

July 6, 2015







Thumbnail: Lars Boom and Vincenzo Nibali chat on stage (Getty Images Sport). "The board of directors of the Movement for Credible Cycling (MPCC) announced on Monday that they have temporarily suspended Team Astana for allowing Lars Boom to start the Tour de France after he returned a pre-race test that showed abnormally low cortisol levels last Thursday.

“In the wake of the choice of Astana to allow Lars Boom to take the start of the Tour de France and thus not to respect the article 9 of the MPCC’s rules, unanimously the board of directors of MPCC take cognizance of this decision and temporarily suspend Team Astana of its movement, waiting for the next meeting of the board of directors according to its statute,” the MPCC’s statement read." (cyclingnews.com)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: Andrew Talansky survived a rough ride on the cobblestones in stage 5 at the 2014 Tour. Photo: Caley Fretz . "One year ago, Tour de France riders awoke to horrendous conditions in Northern France as they prepared for stage 5 and got ready to face the cobblestones used in the “Hell of the North,” Paris-Roubaix.

For American Andrew Talansky, it marked the beginning of his struggles before he would eventually withdraw from the 2014 edition of the Tour prior to the start of stage 12. Looking back, Talansky remembers what he gained that day, not what he lost."

“That [ride] gave me a lot of confidence, being able to do the cobbles in the rain,” Talansky told VeloNews days before the start of the 2015 Tour in Utrecht, Netherlands. “I’m not afraid of the cobbles, I look at it more as an opportunity than something to just get through." (velonews.com)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: Several riders passed through a train crossing seconds before a train whizzed by during Paris-Roubaix this year. Photo: Iri Greco / BrakeThrough Media. "French soldiers will guard every train crossing on the Tour de France route to stop riders from going under the barrier, the government said Monday.

The measure was ordered to prevent a repeat of an incident in this year’s Paris-Roubaix race when riders crossed a line just seconds before a high speed train hurtled by.

Organizers reaffirmed that any rider who breaches safety rules at rail crossings would be thrown out of the Tour.

“On national territory, a representative of the organizers and a Republican Guard will be posted at each level crossing … and ensure the rules for crossing at that particular point,” said a statement released by the interior ministry, Tour de France organizers and the SNCF, France’s state rail company." (velonews.com)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: Adam Hansen at the 2015 Tour Down Under . "Adam Hansen will continue to chase a 12th consecutive Grand Tour finish in spite of a shoulder dislocation on stage two of the 2015 Tour de France.

The flat stage into Zeeland on the North Sea coast of Holland was blighted by crosswinds and bad weather for the latter part of the course, which saw a number of riders crash, including the Australian." (cyclingweekly.co.uk)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: Tyler Farrar is happy in his new role at MTN-Qhubeka this season. Photo: Tim De Waele. "Tyler Farrar is back to the Tour de France after a two-year absence, keen to make up for lost time, and still dreaming of another stage victory.

The 31-year-old returns to the Tour for the first time since 2012 after punching his ticket with upstart MTN-Qhubeka, the first African-registered team to ever race the Tour.

The goal? To win a stage. Any stage. Anywhere during the three-week romp across France.

“I’m super-motivated and excited to be back in the Tour,” Farrar told VeloNews before the start of Sunday’s stage 2. “Our goal as a team is to win a stage. If it’s me, or if it’s any other guy on the team, I’d be very happy. We have the guys to do it.”" (velonews.com)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: Nairo Quintana training for the 2015 Tour de San Luis . "He may be over 90 seconds behind Chris Froome after two stages of the Tour de France, but the bookmakers are not willing to write Nairo Quintana off just yet.

The Colombian was held up by a crash in the peloton on the hectic stage two, which saw him stuck in the second group on the road, over a minute behind the group containing Froome and Alberto Contador." (cyclingweekly.co.uk)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: GoPro has 12 cameras in the race that are circulating among different teams each day (Ben Delaney/Immediate Media). "As the Tour de France peloton busied itself with this year's first road stage, we were more concerned about the moving cavalcade of bikes that allow the riders to do their jobs.

BikeRadar stalked through the line of team buses, dodging harried mechanics, stressed PR folk and nervous pros to bring you the latest Tour tech.

Like the TT bikes we snapped on day one of the Tour, the biggest road-bike trend was obvious – GPS dongles and GoPro cameras." (cyclingnews.com)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: These guys really fit both the snakes and the ladder section. "It is often said that bike racing is like chess on wheels with its complicated and sometimes opaque strategy played out in a wild chaos of a fast-moving peloton.

A smart man would therefore analyze the Tour de France in terms of a chess game with all its complexities. I am not a smart man. So why not try and look at this thing like some board game I can actually relate to." (podiumcafe.com)

July 6, 2015






Thumbnail: Weight-wise, the units differ quite a bit too. "Today GoPro has introduced its tiniest camera to date, the Hero4 Session.  This small cube-like camera shoots up to 1440p footage (that’s a little above your standard 1080p HD), as well as works with the existing GoPro mount lineup.  Most notably, the entire pod is fully waterproofed down to 33ft (10m) – ideal for just about anything water-related except diving." (dcrainmaker.com)

July 6, 2015













July 5, 2015






July 5, 2015


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